Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Suffering from this type of pain? You may have the foot condition known as Morton's neuroma. Morton's neuroma may develop as a result of ill-fitting footwear and existing foot deformities. We can help.

Tuesday, 20 July 2021 00:00

Diabetic foot ulcers (DFUs) are a common complication of diabetes. These foot wounds are difficult to detect in their early stages and heal slowly and poorly, creating a high risk of infection. Fortunately, it is possible to prevent DFUs. The first step in doing so is to protect your feet. Wear comfortable, well-fitting shoes and avoid walking barefoot, even in the home. Small injuries to the foot can go unnoticed and worsen over time due to the lower limb nerve damage and poor circulation that many diabetics face. Protecting your feet helps to avoid those small injuries. Another important step in preventing DFUs is to inspect the feet daily for any abnormalities, such as cuts, scrapes, sores, discoloration, pain, or strange sensations like tingling and numbness. If you notice anything unusual during a daily inspection, contact a podiatrist as soon as possible. A podiatrist can diagnose and treat foot ulcers before they become too severe.

Wound care is an important part in dealing with diabetes. If you have diabetes and a foot wound or would like more information about wound care for diabetics, consult with Richard P. Jacoby, DPM from Extremity Health Centers. Our doctor will assess your condition and provide you with quality foot and ankle treatment.

What Is Wound Care?

Wound care is the practice of taking proper care of a wound. This can range from the smallest to the largest of wounds. While everyone can benefit from proper wound care, it is much more important for diabetics. Diabetics often suffer from poor blood circulation which causes wounds to heal much slower than they would in a non-diabetic. 

What Is the Importance of Wound Care?

While it may not seem apparent with small ulcers on the foot, for diabetics, any size ulcer can become infected. Diabetics often also suffer from neuropathy, or nerve loss. This means they might not even feel when they have an ulcer on their foot. If the wound becomes severely infected, amputation may be necessary. Therefore, it is of the upmost importance to properly care for any and all foot wounds.

How to Care for Wounds

The best way to care for foot wounds is to prevent them. For diabetics, this means daily inspections of the feet for any signs of abnormalities or ulcers. It is also recommended to see a podiatrist several times a year for a foot inspection. If you do have an ulcer, run the wound under water to clear dirt from the wound; then apply antibiotic ointment to the wound and cover with a bandage. Bandages should be changed daily and keeping pressure off the wound is smart. It is advised to see a podiatrist, who can keep an eye on it.

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Scottsdale, Peoria, and Buckeye, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

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Tuesday, 13 July 2021 00:00

Maintaining a healthy weight is essential to your well being, which includes your foot and ankle health. People who are obese are more likely to develop foot pain than those with healthy body weights. Heavier individuals are more prone to flat feet, decreased range of motion, and they also put more pressure on the soles of their feet. All of this can put excess stress on the foot’s tissue and bone structures. Obesity increases an individual’s risk of plantar fasciitis, hammertoes, bunions, and can increase their chances of developing systemic diseases which negatively affect the feet, like diabetes and gout. A podiatrist has a variety of methods to help ease the pressure of excess weight on the feet, including guidance on proper footwear and creating custom orthotics to more evenly distribute weight, support the arch, and relieve pressure points.

Obesity has become very problematic at this point in time and can have extremely negative effects on the feet. If you’re an obese individual and are concerned about your feet, contact Richard P. Jacoby, DPM from Extremity Health Centers. Our doctor can provide the care you need to keep you pain-free and on your feet.

Obesity and Your Feet

Since your feet are what support your entire weight when standing, any additional weight can result in pain and swelling. Being overweight is one of the main contributors to foot complications.

Problems & Complications

Extra Weight – Even putting on just a few extra pounds could create serious complications for your feet. As your weight increases, your balance and body will shift, creating new stresses on your feet. This uneven weight distribution can cause pain, even while doing the simplest tasks, such as walking.

Diabetes – People who are overweight are at serious risk of developing type-2 diabetes, which has a drastic impact on the health of your feet. As you get older, your diabetes might worsen, which could lead to loss of feeling in your feet, sores, and bruises. You could also become more prone to various infections.

Plantar fasciitis – Pressure and stress that is placed on muscles, joints, and tendons can trigger plantar fasciitis, which is an inflammation of tissue that forms along the bottom of the foot. 

If you have any questions please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Scottsdale, Peoria, and Buckeye, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot and ankle needs.

Read more about How Obesity Affects Your Feet
Tuesday, 06 July 2021 00:00

Whether you’re training for a marathon or running just for fun, you should be aware that runners are at an increased risk for foot and ankle injuries. Fortunately, there are a great deal of things that you can do to minimize your risk. When you are beginning to run, it is important to build mileage gradually. Do not suddenly increase the distance or intensity of your runs, as this can strain and damage the muscles and ligaments of your lower limbs. Instead, increase your mileage slowly over time. It is also important to stretch and strengthen your feet and ankles, as strong, flexible lower limbs are more resistant to injuries. Wearing comfortable and supportive shoes, running on level surfaces, and allowing yourself time to rest and recover following runs will help you avoid injury as well. For more information about preventing foot and ankle problems as a runner, please consult with a podiatrist. 

All runners should take extra precaution when trying to avoid injury. If you have any concerns about your feet, contact Richard P. Jacoby, DPM of Extremity Health Centers. Our doctor will treat your foot and ankle needs.

How to Prevent Running Injuries

There are a lot of mistakes a runner can make prior to a workout that can induce injury. A lot of athletes tend to overstretch before running, instead of saving those workouts for a post-run routine. Deep lunges and hand-to-toe hamstring pulls should be performed after a workout instead of during a warmup. Another common mistake is jumping into an intense routine before your body is physically prepared for it. You should try to ease your way into long-distance running instead of forcing yourself to rush into it.

More Tips for Preventing Injury

  • Incorporate Strength Training into Workouts - This will help improve the body’s overall athleticism
  • Improve and Maintain Your Flexibility – Stretching everyday will help improve overall performance
  • “Warm Up” Before Running and “Cool Down” Afterward – A warm up of 5-10 minutes helps get rid of lactic acid in the muscles and prevents delayed muscle soreness
  • Cross-Training is Crucial
  • Wear Proper Running Shoes
  • Have a Formal Gait Analysis – Poor biomechanics can easily cause injury

If you have any questions, please feel free to contact one of our offices located in Scottsdale, Peoria, and Buckeye, AZ . We offer the newest diagnostic and treatment technologies for all your foot care needs.

Read more about Preventing Running Injuries

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